First Lines Friday #2

Hi,

How are today? I’m excited cause I’m going out with all my old school friends tonight! YAY PARTY!
Anyway, I did this a couple weeks ago HERE. I has seen it on Sepia Reads Blog (which I adore and you definitely should check out!) but I believe it was originally started by Wandering Worlds.

What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines? If you want to make your own post, feel free to use or edit the banner above, and follow the rules below:
If you’re using Twitter, don’t forget to use #FirstLinesFridays!

  1. Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  2. Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  3. Finally… reveal the book!

It was 7 minutes after midnight. The dog was lying on the grass in the middle of the lawn in front of Mrs Shears’ house. Its eyes were closed. It looked as if it was running on it’s side, the way dogs run when they think they are chasing a cat in a dream. But the dog was not running or asleep. The dog was dead.


So? Would you read this? I want honesty in the comments below. Also can you guess the book?

And so, the book is…The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon. A very popular book and a great stage show, at least when I saw it in London 2017 it was. I told my brother to pick book from my bookshelf for this, and this is what he picked – he probably picked it because he had to read it at school and recognised it. Anyway, here is the blurb:

Christopher John Francis Boone knows all the countries of the world and their capitals and every prime number up to 7,057. He relates well to animals but has no understanding of human emotions. He cannot stand to be touched. And he detests the color yellow.
Although gifted with a superbly logical brain, for fifteen-year-old Christopher everyday interactions and admonishments have little meaning. He lives on patterns, rules, and a diagram kept in his pocket. Then one day, a neighbor’s dog, Wellington, is killed and his carefully constructive universe is threatened. Christopher sets out to solve the murder in the style of his favourite (logical) detective, Sherlock Holmes. What follows makes for a novel that is funny, poignant and fascinating in its portrayal of a person whose curse and blessing are a mind that perceives the world entirely literally.

So, without any prior knowledge, would you read this? Did you guess what it was? I enjoy these snappy and quick posts and the interaction from you guys. I hope you enjoyed, see you tomorrow 🙂

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